Fellaini's GQ shoot hits out at football's toxic masculinity / by Justin Salhani

 Photo by David Hughes of GQ Style

Photo by David Hughes of GQ Style

Since Marouane Fellaini, first graced the premier league, he’s grabbed headlines for all the wrong reasons. Often on the receiving end of a disciplinary card for a flying elbow or crunching tackle, he’s been labeled as a thug — or worse. However, the 6’ 4” Belgian's recent shoot with GQ might tell a different narrative.

Fellaini traded in his signature curly hairstyle for a pair of “Mickey ears” and a head dress. Not what many might call a look fitting for an intrepid defensive midfielder. When asked his opinion of people labeling him a thug, he replied, “It think it’s easy for them to portray me as an aggressive player but I’m not. I try to play my game…”

 Photo by David Hughes of GQ Style

Photo by David Hughes of GQ Style

Traditional stereotypes of footballers, and at often men in general, invoke dominant, masculine traits. More than ever, footballers are breaking stereotypes and pushing the boundaries of fashion. And we love it. Players, like Fellaini, use their hairstyles, clothing choices and more to express themselves on and off the field. The previous toxic masculine traits are being positively contrasted with expression, feeling and emotion — something we hope never leaves the football scene.

Words Champion Slye
Edits Justin Salhani